Below this message I am posting the shortened version of my letter 

to the editor of the Washington Post, responding to Steve Clemons'  

attack of August 27 on me and my newspaper.

 

My first letter to the Washington Post was sent on August 30 and 

was 479 words in length, not 800 as Mr. Clemons has absurdly

claimed. Mr. Vince Reinehart, the Washington Post editorial copy desk

chief, sent me a message the same day informing me the Post was

interested in my letter but asking that I shorten it to about 250

words.  

My shortened letter, the body of which is 254 words, 

was sent on August 31 at the request of the editors at the

Washington Post.

 

The following day, a different editor called and acknowledged receipt

of my shortened letter and informed me it was being circulated for

comment to the editor who worked on Mr. Clemons' attack

against me, also giving me optimism, but not promising that

they would publish it.  
Since that time the Washington Post has not communicated with me.

 

On September 8, I sent a polite email inquiry to

both editors who had contacted me inquiring of the status of my

letter and of the intentions with respect to its publication.  

Neither of them, nor anyone else from the Post,

has ever replied to me.

 

In contrat to Mr. Clemons' claims in his "To the Forum" letter of

September 19, the Washington Post has never informed me

(or even implied)that they have edited my letter.  

Nor did I ever send an 800 word letter to the Washington Post.  

Nor did I ever " decide to be outraged."

 

 

My shortened letter, sent August 31 at the request of the

Washington Post:

 

 

To the Editor

The Washington Post

1150 15th Street, NW

Washington, DC 20071

 

Dear Editor:



In an op/ed by Steve Clemons (The Rise of Japan's Thought Police, 

Sunday, August 27, P.B02), the author engages in a personal

attack on my integrity and is also wrong on key facts.Clemons' 

statements and the true facts are as follows:

 

Clemons: The Sankei Newspaper and Komori are

part of "an increasingly militant group of extreme right wing

activists who yearn for a return to 1930s-style militarism."

Response: Sankei is a mainstream Japanese newspaper

distributing 2.2 million copies daily.

Neither Sankei nor I have any association whatsoever

with any such activists.

 

Clemons: Komori is "not unaware that his words frequently animate

them(terrorists)--and that their actions in turn lend

fear-fueled power to his pronouncements, helping them silence 

debate." 

Response: Clemons is accusing me of deliberately trying

to inspire acts of terror. 

He provides no substantiation, nor could he, for his

assertion.  In short, both Sankei and I denounce and oppose such 

acts.  
In fact, Sankei severely condemned the recent deplorable arson 
that burned the house of Koichi Kato, a political opponent of
Prime Minister Koizumi for which Kato personally thanked the editors.

Clemons: Komori stifled freedom of expression.
Response: I reported on a govenment-funded institute that was 
disseminating exclusively in English for an overseas audience, 
highly opinionated criticism and misrepresentations of government 

policies
and leaders.  I strongly support free speech, including informing the 

public about government-funded      

ostensively objective policy institute   facilitating such attacks.  

I did not, as Clemons asserts, demand an apology or any other action

from anyone.

 

Sincerely yours,

 

Yoshihisa Komori

Editor-at-Large(Washington)

The Sankei Shimbun